The 2nd National Emergency Department survey of Alcohol Identification and Intervention activity

Small Grant

Are UK alcohol policy and NICE guidelines, commending the use of screening tools and delivery of brief advice in hospital emergency departments being adopted?

Binge Drinking and Emergency Departments

Small Grant

“Binge drinking” and associated harms in terms of health, crime and disorder have been extensively highlighted and are a cause of considerable concern in urban areas of the United Kingdom. This research set out to quantify the number of patient attendances at a busy adult and children’s Emergency Department that are directly attributable to binge drinking, and investigate ways in which inter-agency sharing of anonymised information may be used to design, implement and monitor interventions that will work to reduce these harms.

Strategy for Implementing Screening and Brief Alcohol Interventions in Primary Health Care in England

Research and Development Grant

There is abundant evidence that screening for hazardous and harmful drinking in the primary health care setting and offering brief advice to patients drinking over recommended levels for “safe” alcohol consumption is an effective and cost-effective means of reducing alcohol-related harm. It is estimated that, if screening and brief intervention (SBI) were routinely offered to such patients by general practitioners, practices nurses and other primary health care (PHC) staff, the benefits for public health would be considerable. Unfortunately, however, for a variety of reasons, PHC staff have been slow to incorporate SBI into their daily working practices and an opportunity significantly to reduce alcohol-related harm is being lost. The study funded by AERC was aimed at making a contribution to solving this problem.

A Randomised Controlled Trial of Brief Intervention Strategies in Patients with Alcohol Related Facial Injury

Research and Development Grant

Despite the fact that most alcohol related facial injuries are successfully managed surgically, the underlying cause, which is often alcohol misuse, is not adequately addressed. A recent study has demonstrated that a nurse delivered brief intervention in a maxillofacial unit is more effective than no intervention in en­couraging patients with facial injuries to reduce their alcohol consumption.

The Effects of Alcohol Consumption in People with Diabetes

Research and Development Grant

Healthy drinking of alcohol may provide some protective effect in reducing the risk of the arterial thickening associated with ageing. Diabetics have an increased risk of developing vascular disease and most dietitians advise their patients to cut back on their alcohol intake. Could this put them at greater risk of vascular disease?

Reducing alcohol consumption in young men with alcohol-related facial injuries

Research and Development Grant

Maxillo-facial surgeons see a regular stream of young male casualties with alcohol ­related facial injuries. The majority of them have been involved in a fight, usually on a Friday or Saturday night. They attend an A&E department, receive appropriate treatment and are given an appointment for a follow-up clinic within the next 10 days. This clinic provides an ideal opportunity to influence the drinking patterns of these young men. Can a brief alcohol intervention, given at this point, influence future alcohol consumption?

FAST screening for alcohol problems

Research and Development Grant

Could a shorter questionnaire be used instead of the AUDIT when there are pressures on time?